MDI Biological Laboratory

Archive for: zebrafish

Shaping Maine’s Scientific Future

Earlier this month, MDI Biological Laboratory’s President, Dr. Hermann Haller, addressed those attending Eggs & Issues, the Portland (Maine) Chamber of Commerce’s premier breakfast event. As guest speaker, Dr Haller reflected on shaping the scientific future of our beautiful state, and the hard work that MDIBL is engaging in to create world-class education and training opportunities…

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Comparative Biology: Animal Models Strut Their Stuff

  At MDIBL, researchers are particularly focused on the mechanisms of aging and regeneration. Non-mammalian model organisms like C. elegans, zebrafish, African turquoise killifish, and the axolotl regenerate naturally in ways that humans cannot. By decoding the instruction manual for their regenerative abilities, we can develop new strategies to enhance our natural ability to repair…

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Visiting Scientist Nishad Jayasundara, Ph.D.: Solving the Riddle of the Mysterious Kidney Ailment Plaguing Farmers Around the World

Solving the Riddle of the Mysterious Kidney Ailment Plaguing Farmers Around the World Environmental toxicologist Nishad Jayasundara, Ph.D., had a problem: his team had identified potentially toxic agricultural chemicals in the drinking water of Sri Lankan farmers suffering from a mysterious kidney disease called chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology or CKDu (so named to…

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Sharing MDIBL Career to Inspire Young Scientists

Held virtually this year, Karlee was one of three Maine scientists chosen to share, via video, a bit about what life science is, the variety of jobs within the industry, about MDI Biological Laboratory, and what her day-to-day job looks like. She also wrote the below blog to give more insight how she came to…

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Visiting Scientist Gert Fricker, Ph.D.: Taking Some Lessons in Toughness from a Hardy Local Fish

Anyone who has spent time at the MDI Biological Laboratory in the summer over the last 35 years has probably seen Gert Fricker, Ph.D., a visiting scientist from the University of Heidelberg in Germany, with a graduate student or two, collecting Atlantic killifish (Fundalus heteroclitus) from Northeast Creek, a tidal estuary near the laboratory’s campus…

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Citizen Scientists Support Doctoral Research

Arsenic, lead, and uranium, naturally occurring contaminants in some groundwater, are not uncommon in New England, where significant portions of the population rely on wells for drinking water. Long-term or acute exposure to these contaminants can lead to multiple types of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and more. Federal and state guidelines regulate the maximum contaminant…

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Research by Iain Drummond, Ph.D., Brings Science Closer to Kidney Replacement Tissue

Each of the body’s approximately one million nephrons, the functional units of the kidney, contains a glomerulus, or a cluster of blood vessels where filtration takes place. The membranes of the glomeruli are lined with specialized cells called podocytes, which have tiny, foot-like projections (podo means “having a foot” in Latin) that protrude into the…

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New Horizons for the Treatment of Diabetic Complications

Chronic complications of diabetes are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality not only in the western world but worldwide. The metabolic changes caused by diabetes, especially hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels), can lead over time to damage in the circulation system of the diabetic patient. Subsequent ischemia (inadequate blood supply reaching organs) occurs, as…

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Women In Science Day 2021 – Olivia Aries

To mark Women in Science Day on February 11, 2021, we’re sharing the stories of female scientists, past and present, at the MDI Biological Laboratory. Olivia Aries: Making Her Own Path The global pandemic has upended all aspects of life, and millions of college students have had their education disrupted, deferred, or differ drastically from…

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